Keegan Precast - Precast concrete walls floors and stairs

FAQs

What is a part load charge?

Any order below 5 meter’s incurs a part load charge. Example: If you order 2 meters then a part load charge of 3 meters will be added.

Do you have a conveyor belt on your concrete bottle lorries?

No, we don't have a conveyor belt on any of our concrete bottle lorries.

What is a U Value?

A U value is a measure of heat loss in an external building element such as windows, walls or roof. The higher the U value the worse the thermal performance of the building envelope. A low U value usually indicates high levels of insulation. Keegan Precast Concrete Sandwich Wall offers u-values ranging from 0.15 to 0.30.

What is the KC Wall?

The Keegan Precast KC Wall is our insulated twin wall. It includes the exact same components with the addition of the insulation boards.

How much rebar is fitted between the two precast leaves?

Keegan Precast do not place rebar between the two precast leaves. On site the twin wall is filled with in-situ concrete only.

What are the standard items?

Keegan Precast uses a standard system, but all designs are bespoke to the requirements of each client. 

What is GGBS (Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag)

GGBS is achieved through quenching molten iron slag (a by product of iron and steel) from a blast furnace in water or steam. This produces a glassy, granular product that is dried and ground into a fine powder.

Concrete made with GGBS cement sets slowly compared to concrete made with Portland Cement depending on the amount of GGBS in the cementitious material, but also continues to gain strength over a longer period in production conditions.

The use of GGBS significantly reduces the risk of damages caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR), provides higher resistance to chloride ingress, reduces the risk of reinforcement corrosion and provides a higher resistance to attacks by sulphate and other chemicals.

GGBS cement is added to concrete in the manufacturing plant in Trammon, Rathmolyon, Co. Meath, along with the Portland Cement, aggregates and water.

The use of GGBS cement in concrete in Ireland is covered in the new Irish concrete standard IS EN 206-1:2002.